Kaktovik includes Barter Island, 90 miles west of the Canadian border and 280 miles southeast of Barrow. The village is on the northern edge of the 20-million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The ruins of old Kaktovik can be seen from the road into the village from the airport. The community incorporated as a second class city in 1971.

Population and Economy

In 2010, North Slope Borough census data indicated there were 308 residents in Kaktovik and a labor force of 186 in 2011, according to the State’s Employment Statistics. More than 88 percent of residents are Iñupiat. Thirty-two percent of the working residents are employed by the North Slope Borough, and another 25 percent work for the School District. Almost thirty-seven percent of the work force is employed in the private sector, primarily by Native corporations and their affiliates. Like other communities in the region, subsistence hunting, fishing and whaling play a major role in the local economy. Hunting in the nearby area is for Dall sheep, moose, caribou and fox.

The community also produces arts and crafts for sale, such as etched baleen, carved ivory and masks.

Quality of Life

The Borough provides Kaktovik with public electricity and delivers piped water and sewer services. The NSB also provides trash pick-up free of charge.

The Harold Kaveolook School offers education from pre-school through grade 12 and adult basic education. Communications include phones, mail, public radio and cable TV.

A health clinic staffed by community health aides is open during the day and available around the clock for emergencies. Kaktovik has a public safety building and a fire station equipped with fire engines and an ambulance.

The Kaktovik Iñupiat Corporation runs the local store which provides groceries, clothing, first-aid, hardware, camera film and sporting goods. In the community, fishing and hunting licenses and guide services are available. Available fuel includes marine gas, diesel, propane, unleaded and regular. There are repair services for autos and aircrafts, and charter aircraft service is available.

Transportation to the village is provided by scheduled airlines and air taxi service from Barrow and Fairbanks. Freight arrives by cargo plane and barge. Kaktovik is a dry village in which the sale and possession of alcoholic beverages is prohibited.
 
For more information contact: 

City of Kaktovik Kaktovik Inupiat Corporation Native Village of Kaktovik
P.O. Box 27 P.O. Box 73 P.O. Box 8
Kaktovik, AK 99747 Kaktovik, AK 99747 Kaktovik, AK 99747
(907) 640-6317 (907) 640-6120 (907) 640-2042